My Cathedral City

bb1 One of the exciting things we do at Urban Life is organise Theology-to-Go groups in cities across the UK. These groups allow urban Christian practitioners to get together with other practitioners in their area and theologically reflect on various issues their local context are facing.

Bob Baxter, one of of our Theology-to-Go participants in Glasgow, has been creative in his reflections as he wrote a poem about it. You can hear his poem  My Cathedral City here:

 

Some notes on the poem provided by Bob:

Jenny Geddes (c. 1600 – c. 1660) was a Scottish market-trader in Edinburgh, who is alleged to have thrown her stool at the head of the minister in St Giles’ Cathedral in objection to the first public use of the Anglican Book of Prayer in Scotland. The act is reputed to have sparked the riot which led to the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, which included the English Civil War

The first use of the prayer book was in St Giles’ on Sunday 23 July 1637, when James Hannay, Dean of Edinburgh, began to read the Collects, part of the prescribed service, and Jenny Geddes, a market-woman or street-seller, threw her stool straight at the Minister’s head. Some sources describe it as a “fald stool” or a “creepie-stool” meaning a folding stool as shown flying towards the Dean in the illustration, while others claim that it was a larger, three-legged cuttie-stool. As she hurled the stool she is reported to have yelled:De’il gie you colic, the wame o’ ye, fause thief; daur ye say Mass in my lug?” meaning “Devil cause you colic in your stomach, false thief: dare you say the Mass in my ear?”.

 

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